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Using a Car as a Down Payment (!?), ADUs, House Hacking 101


House hacking and renting by the room are two of the easiest ways for rookies to dive into the world of real estate investing. Both investing strategies are affordable, low-risk, and easy to implement. The best part? They can help cover your mortgage payment each month and give you MORE money to invest!

Welcome back to another Rookie Reply! Want to earn some extra cash flow by adding an accessory dwelling unit (ADU) to your rental property? In this episode, we’ll show you how to present your plan to the city and get your new unit approved. If you need money for a down payment, you’ll want to hear about the creative method one of our recent guests used to come up with funds. We even talk about buying abandoned houses—how to locate the “missing” owner and swoop in with your irresistible offer!

Ashley:
This is Real Estate rookie episode 395. Would you consider using a Tesla as a down payment on your house? We’re going to find out today. My name is Ashley Care, and I am here with Tony j Robinson.

Tony :
And welcome to the Real Estate Rookie Podcast, where every week, three times a week, we’re bringing you the inspiration, motivation, and stories you need to hear to kickstart your investing journey. And like Ashley said, we got some great questions lined up for today. We’re going to talk about accessory dwelling units, when you can build them when you can’t, and what to do if you get stuck caught up by the city when they’re telling that you can’t build one out. And be sure to stick around until the end, because we’ve got a really cool story about kicking squatters out of your property with a 100% success rate. But first, let’s get into how Teslas are covering someone’s down payment. So one of the biggest questions that we get from Ricky Investors is, how do I get the capital to fund maybe my second, my third, or my fourth deal? And there are some traditional ways of just saving up your cold hard cash from your jobs, but there’s some more creative ways to do that as well. So we’re bringing back Chase Rifa, who was on episode 393 to talk about one of the ways that he creatively financed the cost for one of his investment property. So Chase, welcome back to the show. Brothers. Super excited to have you.

Chase:
Thank you. Thank you for having me back. Yes, creative financing. I think it was more of a product of the time, but I think it’s just taking advantage and also striking while the iron’s hot, I guess s, it was a pretty electric time, that time. So with that said, at the time that we were scaling, I was just, man, look at that Tesla model SI so want that looks so cool. But my wife was like, we’re not having that. We have kids we can’t ride in that. I was like, okay, fine. I’ll pre-order the model Y because that’s the one you want. And then I was like, well, what about this one, the Model X, it could qualify for section 1 79. It’s got 6,000 pounds.

Ashley:
Chase, explain real quick what that is for someone who, oh, sorry. Yeah. Has no

Chase:
Idea. Yeah, so Section 1 79 allows you to write off a, at the time with 100% bonus depreciation, completely writing it off of your business. If it’s 6,000 pounds or more, it’s usually dealt with machinery, but it was actually dubbed the Hummer rule because the Hummer at the time was heavier than 6,000 pounds. And then after that, because electric vehicles with their batteries are so heavy, they also qualify for that. I believe it’s the gross vehicle weight above 6,000 pounds.

Ashley:
And Gew wagons, you can’t forget about everybody who gets G wagons to qualify.

Chase:
Oh yeah, all the time they talk about GWAS all the time. Yeah. So that’s the reason why we brought up the Model X because it qualified for that. And then another one that qualified for it was a new company called the Rivian R one T. So we put in a pre-order for that, and you’re like, why are you talking about all these things? Well, at the time I was like, well, it’s a hundred dollars and it’s refundable, who cares? But the pandemic hit, and Elon started raising the prices and I’m like, oh, shoot, if I take delivery of this, I’m going to have instant equity. When does that ever happen? So I thought, no, it couldn’t be. I took delivery, I just a hundred percent financed it, and then I listed it right away. I drove it around looking cool, but I didn’t put that many miles on it. And then I sold it. I sold the S, the Y, the X and the Rivian. Oh my God. And then all for a profit. And then I used all of that and we purchased another property in the Smokies.

Ashley:
And what was the profit on that?

Chase:
Right. Okay, so the Y wasn’t as much. It was about five to 7,000 x pretty good, surprisingly wasn’t that much either. It was seven to 10,000. But the Model S was a $19,000 profit, and the Rivian was like a $23,000 profit. Shut

Ashley:
Up dude. And you’re saying not that much on the other ones. What was your time into that? I mean, not that much time spent compared to No, not that much. Time spent the 5 23. Oh my gosh. Wow.

Chase:
Yeah, on the rivian, because I was a early pre holder, and at first I thought I was going to keep it. I was like, wow, this is the ultimate truck. It’s faster than anything. And then my wife and I discussed it. I was like, everything on it is electronic. It’s going to fail. And so yeah, we sold it and now I just drive a 2000 land cruiser that will never break, but yeah, I’d rather have rather have a property anyway. Yeah,

Tony :
Dude, what a creative hack to really fund that next deal of all the almost 400 episodes we’ve done. I don’t think I’ve ever heard that strategy. It does remind me though, Ashley, I wish I could remember which guess this was, we had a guess who came on and there were only buying new construction townhomes. Do you remember that? And he’d buy in the first phase, and by the time the last phase of the new construction finished, he had enough equity where he could just sell and then get his next deal. So it was almost like a flip, but he didn’t have to do any work. It was just the appreciation coming from the new builds. Right.

Chase:
Love that.

Ashley:
Geez, one question I have is, what was the outcome of the property that you actually used this money for? Did the money cover the full down payment on the property you bought?

Chase:
Yeah, it did. It covered the full down payment of it. I think we had to come in with a little bit of money, and then we negotiated closing costs with the seller and the lender. But I mean, it essentially bought us another property to scale, which was incredible. And it really taught us how to scale in that. And now Smokey’s is one of our favorite markets now, and that’s where we’re going to build in the future.

Ashley:
Very cool. Well Chase, thank you so much for sharing this story with us. One thing I do have to ask, I don’t know if either of you will know the answer, but Tony, I thank you, had said before that you do have a deposit on a Tesla truck, and I had heard somewhere that you can’t resell them, that they’re not allowing you to resell them. Is that true? Do you guys know that, that maybe this hack will not work anymore?

Tony :
I did see that floating around, but I feel like there was so much bad press. I think Tesla change in that, not doing it language or something. Yeah, so I dunno, I could be wrong. I’m still waiting on my cyber truck, I think three years later, four years later. So we’ll see what happens.

Chase:
I did a pre-order for that too. Yeah,

Tony :
Yeah. Chase, appreciate you coming on brother. And again, for all of our rookies that are listening, if you want Chase’s full background, head over to episode 393 to get Chase’s backstory, height got started and all that good stuff. But Chase, thank you for coming back for round two.

Chase:
Thank you, Tony. Thank you Ashley.

Tony :
Well, I think that might be the craziest story I’ve ever heard about how to fund your down payment, but now you guys got another tool in your tool belt. So coming up we’ve got a story on abandoned houses and dealing with the city on an A DU. But first let’s hear a quick word from our show sponsors. Alright, welcome back guys. Coming up, we’ve got a question about dealing with the city about building an A DU. But first we have an abandoned house question. So Paul Singer asks, I found an abandoned house in my neighborhood that I would like to buy. I looked up the owner’s name and their address and it’s listed at the same house. Any recommendations on what to do next to potentially figure out how to get ahold of them or to find out the status of the house? So we’ve got another abandoned house. Ash, what’s your go-to for looking up homeowner information in this kind of situation?

Ashley:
So I did it once before and I don’t think I would go this route again, but me and my business partner, he actually wanted to buy this house as his primary residence. It was a vacant house and we actually went to the neighbor’s house and we asked the neighbors what were going on and we actually found out the property had gone into foreclosure. So it was the same thing when you looked up the property, looked up the owners, their mailing address for all the property taxes, everything was still, the system hadn’t updated it to the bank yet. So that was kind of our first step of, okay, now we need to locate the bank, find out which bank owns it now, things like that. And it actually ended up going up for auction, the property. But now what I would do is I would do a little bit more computer work instead of actively going and because everyone knows I’m so introverted of knocking on people’s doors.

Ashley:
But the first step I would take is to literally just doing a Google search of the people’s name and seeing whatever you can find like white pages. There’s a lot of different websites that give you some kind free information about people that you can look up. So there’s other ones too, like search people free.com and then maybe you can kind of find a new updated address for these people. Just digging online is really the first step. The second thing you can do is actually search the property address and look up to is there any sales record? Maybe the county hasn’t really updated their system yet, their records yet where it’s not recorded. And then also I like to go to the county clerk’s office of records. So the website for your county that keeps all of the record files. Most of the times these are online and they are free to pull.

Ashley:
You don’t have to usually pay for any kind of access to these files. And I would search the person’s name that way also. And you would be able to see any deeds. So any deeds that were put in their name or taken out of their name, you would also see any mortgages they got, you could see judgements against them. And so I would start from there and look at if maybe they’re actually deeded a new property too or if you can see that there was actually a foreclosure filed against them. So those would kind of be my three routes as to where it’d go to start digging into finding the owner of the property. Tony, what about you?

Tony :
Yeah, everything that you said, Asha, I totally agree with. I think trying to skip trace them as well. If you use a paid tool like Prop Stream, you can skip trace these owners and Skip Trace just basically means it’s looking up contact info like phone numbers and emails. And a lot of times you’re going to get back junk, but all you need is one good working number out of whatever it spits back. And then you can reach out via email, via text call to see if you can get them on the phone. The other thing that works pretty well is, and this is a feature that I think might be specific to Stream, but I’m sure some of the other tools have this as well. But inside a prop stream, if you type in the address, there’s a bunch of different tabs here like transaction history, mortgage balance, et cetera.

Tony :
But one of those tabs is linked properties and when you type in linked properties or when you click on that tab, it’ll show you any other properties associated with that owner. So they might have another address somewhere else where they’ve been associated to. So you can reach out via L there as well. So like Ashley said, I think leaning on the kind of digital resources is a good place to start. That way you’re not chasing around. But for me, skip tracing phone numbers, emails, and then looking for maybe other associated properties they might have. Alright, so our next question today comes from Dax V and Dax says, Hey guys, I’m in the process of doing a meeting with the city and I’m presenting my plan to add an A DU in one of our units. I talked to the planning department and they mentioned that ADUs are not designed to be rental units.

Tony :
Examples of living arrangements according to them include seniors occupying a second family living unit or apartment or families with elderly parents unable to live alone. What would you say to them if you, we have some equity trapped in one of our properties and we’re planning to use that to add the unit. Appreciate any feedback. So before we answer DAXs question, I just want to take a second to kind of clarify what we believe this question is actually asking. So basically DAXs owns a property, he has some equity, he wants to use that equity to build an A DU or an accessory dwelling unit. Basically a small unit on the back of his primary residence. But the planning department who’s in charge of telling you what you can and can’t do with the property within that city had told him that ADUs cannot be used as rentals.

Tony :
You can only use ’em if you’re like housing a family member or someone like that that maybe is unable to live by themselves. So I think the first thing, and we kind talked about this before we went live on the recording here, I think the first thing is, and this is for all of our rookies, just before you actually close on any property, and Dax, assuming this might be your primary residence or maybe that wasn’t the case, but for anyone that’s doing this with the intention of it being a rental, you’ll always want to check with the planning department before you actually close to ensure that the local rules and regulations around ADUs or building align with your business plan. Because the last thing you want to do is buy a property, then realize that you can’t actually build the A DU and now you’re stuck with this property. So Ash, if you are in D’S position, you’ve got this feedback from the planning department that hey, maybe you can’t do it as a rental, this A DU, what steps did you take from there? Yeah,

Ashley:
I think my first thing is actually reading the code and making sure that it’s not just a guideline, that it’s actually a rule or regulation that you can’t, and that’s not just that they’re saying the idea for us to allow ADUs was for this purpose and not that they’re physically saying you literally can’t do it, it’s against the laws, you’ll be fine, blah, blah, blah violation. So that would be the first step. The second step would be actually going before the planning board. So that’s maybe hiring your architect. They’ll often actually go in front of the planning board for you and you don’t even have to do that where they’ll submit a proposal for you, they’ll submit the drawings and you can go ahead and go before the planning board to get the approval for the additional unit and what the purpose of that is going to be.

Ashley:
Sometimes you’ll have to be there to answer questions or your architect will actually take care of all the questions and you don’t even have to go. So that would be my first step is to actually submitting a proposal to the planning board. And what the planning board will do during that time is they will actually, when your date is scheduled for that meeting, they will send out letters to all the neighboring parcels to let them know. So there’s one property where I gets this constantly of people who are requesting zoning variances because maybe they want to put a fence up and it’s going to be a little bit closer than is allowed, or they want to develop something on a parcel of land, all these different things, and they notify so that if you want to dispute it as to say, no, this is not a benefit to me as the owner of my parcel can go. So that is something that could come up is where your neighbors all come and say, no, we don’t want rental units in here and we’re going to pitch to the planning board why you should not be allowed to have that as a rental unit. So that would be my first step there is actually submitting the proposal to the planning board and going through the process of getting it approved so that later on down the road you don’t get in trouble and have to shut down your rental property.

Tony :
Yeah, we just released episode 3 88 with Ashley Robinson, no relation to neither Ashley care nor Tony Robinson, but episode 3 88 and she talked all about how she was able to rezone a property that she purchased because she was bumping up against a similar issue. So Dax, maybe if it’s not, Hey, can I get this approved under the current zoning, maybe is there a clear path forward for you to rezone that current parcel so that it can be used in the way that you want to use it? Now the other thing that I’ll share as well, Dax, is that instead of going to the planning department, the city, whoever, and saying, Hey, I want to turn this into an A DU, what should I do? Say, Hey, I just want to build the second structure on this land that I already own. What is the best path forward for me to do that?

Tony :
And maybe they tell you that instead of trying to zone that property as an A DU or build it as an A DU, maybe just split the parcel and now you’ve got two separate parcels, right? You’ve got two separate addresses, so now you can build it up as its own structure but still use the equity from that first property. So there’s a lot of different ways to skin the cap, but I think sharing what your ideal end result is with the planning department and if they’re good people, if they’re nice people, maybe they’ll help you figure out what the best path forward is for you. But yeah, splitting that parcel might be a good option for you as well. Well Dax, hopefully you’re able to use that information to give you some insight on how to navigate this whole planning situation you got going on up next we’ve got a question about house hacking and we’re also going to be talking a little bit about summer rentals, but first we’re going to take a quick break to hear a word from our show sponsors.

Tony :
Alright, we are back. We just heard about D’S situation from the planning commission and how to navigate that and our next question comes from George Martin and George says, I’m under contract on my first house hack and was hoping to get some advice from others who have done it before right now. George has a few points here, so bear with me as I read through these. George says, is it recommended to get a separate bank account to collect rent from the other unit even if it’s just going right to the mortgage payment? I’m inheriting a tenant for four months until her lease is up. She’s been renting for almost 10 years and paying the same rent since she moved in. She’s paying nine 50 and market rent is about 1500 to 1700. Her unit’s very outdated. It just needs a little creativity and some sweat equity when she moves.

Tony :
I plan on spending a couple of months updating the house to better my chances of getting close to market rent. I wasn’t planning on saving anything from her rent for CapEx or maintenance since I plan on taking care of that in a few months when she’s out, I have the cash reserves to cover those expect in case something goes wrong. And those first few months while she’s still there. Any tax related advice you wish you had known before you house hack? And then last, I’m scheduling a visit with my accountant later this month to put together a game plan, but I was curious to hear from others’ expenses. So George has a lot there. I think first ash, maybe let’s just define house hacking and what that is for maybe some of our newer Ricky audience members. So house hacking is when you buy a property to live in for yourself and then you rent out other portions of that house of that property, long-term, short-term, midterm, whatever it may be to someone else.

Tony :
So it could be, hey, I’m a single young professional and I’m buying a six bedroom house and I’m going to rent out the other five bedrooms. Or it could be like our friend Craig Op who wrote the book on house hacking for BiggerPockets and he got a big house and slept on the couch so he could rent out all the rooms. But that’s one way of house hacking. You could buy a primary home within an A DU in the back, right? A small accessory dwelling unit. You could buy a duplex or a triplex where you live in one unit and rent out the other. So that is house hacking at its core. So let’s just break some of these questions out, Ash. I think the first one is, is it recommended to get a separate bank account to collect rent from the other unit even though it’s just going right towards the mortgage? So what would you do in that situation? Would you set it up separately or would you collect it and how would you handle it?

Ashley:
At first when you read this, I thought it was going to say separate from my personal bank account, but that you definitely want to do you want to collect rent in a different bank account, even if you own it individually, set up a separate bank account, even your personal name, and then have the rent go into that and pay the expenses out of that. It’ll make your bookkeeping so much easier than commingling with your personal account. Okay, but this question is if you have two units, should you put the rent income for each unit into a separate bank account for each unit or the same one? 100% the same one because you’re just creating more work by doing it in two different things. You’ll have to set up automatic payments out of two accounts to cover your mortgage. So the same rental units, the only reason you would do separate bank accounts for your rental units is if maybe there is a different partnership or different, you have like my sister and I own a house, her rent isn’t going into the same bank account that the properties are that I own in my personal name, even though my personal name is on the property, her and I own together.

Ashley:
We’re just not going to, we have a separate bank account that, so if you do have a partner, then also if you have an LLC or you have an entity, whatever it may be, or you’re doing a joint venture, I would keep that separate from the other properties that I have that don’t have any partners on them. And then keep my partners bank accounts separate too. So you could follow that if there’s different entities, keep them separate. But if you have these properties in your personal name or they’re all in the same LLC, super easy to use the same bank account and base lane bank, you can have one bank account, you can actually create individual accounts. So if you wanted to keep track of it by unit, you can separate it so that bank account X, XX has a subdivision of it of unit one and then unit two and you can have the rent go into each of those. But by property type, maybe you’ll want to classify it as that. I do for all my bookkeeping, the rent is from this property, this rent is from that property. That’s where it may be beneficial, but if all the units are in the same property, I don’t see it. Any benefit is just more work for you.

Tony :
Yeah, I had agree with that Ash. I think in this specific situation where it’s a house hack one account for the whole house hack probably makes sense. I actually do have a separate checking account for every single one of our properties. And the reason I did it that way is because I feel like it is a little bit more work on the front end to set everything up and kind of keeping track of the debit cards and the account numbers and all that stuff. But I feel like it makes a monthly bookkeeping a little bit easier because now my bookkeeper never has to ask me like, Hey, what property was this for? And as long as we’re being diligent about uploading receipts and making sure she has that visibility, she almost never in theory should have to ask us questions about, Hey, what are these transactions?

Tony :
Because the bank account will always tell her which property it’s for and the receipt or the whatever memo note we add will tell her what it’s about. Different ways to skin the cat there. But I agree with you. I think one account for a house hack probably makes the most sense. Next one here he says, so I’m inheriting a tenant four months until her lease is up. She’s been there for 10 years, she’s paying nine 50, market rent is 1500 to 1700. Little bit of updating or a little bit of updating needs to be done from there. But I guess his question here is, or maybe the comment really that we should give him some feedback on. He says, I wasn’t planning on saving anything from her rent for CapEx or maintenance since I plan on taking care of that in a few months when she moves out, I have the cash reserves to cover those expenses in case something goes wrong while she’s still there. I guess what are your thoughts on that Ash? Would you, because I dunno, I guess he’s just going to be using it to maybe apply towards the mortgage or put it in his pocket, whatever it may be. What are your thoughts on not saving any of that rent payment for CapEx reserves, et cetera?

Ashley:
Yeah, I think that if you already have the X amount that you feel comfortable, you already have three to six months and I say heavier onto the six month side of those reserves saved up, there’s no reason to keep adding to the pot. But if an expense does come up and you to spend $250 for a plumber to come out, then that month’s cashflow, you’re not going to take it and use for whatever. You’re going to replenish your reserves. So that’s where I would say is to, if you’re actually have to dip into your reserves, go ahead and replenish it. But to have money just building this huge amount of cash reserves at some point right now, you could be making 5% having that in a bank account, so not totally a bad thing, but dumping so much money into your reserves and having a ridiculous amount, you’re going to actually lose out on other investment opportunities.

Ashley:
And in this case, having, it’s a very minimal amount of cashflow, she’s paying way below market value. It’s not going to make that huge of an impact if you do save it the next four months. But I don’t see any need as long as you have reserves in place for CapEx or maintenance, but also that you have enough reserves in place to cover those three months that you’re going to be renovating it. So make sure you can pay the utilities, you can pay the insurance, you can pay the mortgage on the property, you can pay to have the grass cut, whatever your expenses are for that property, make sure you can cover them for those three months, it’s going to be vacant. And I would even add in some cushion too, in case the rehab takes longer than you think you have a little bit extra. So that six months of reserves would be great there.

Tony :
Next piece of this question here is any tax related advice you wish you had known before you house hacked? I’ve never personally house hacked, so I would say definitely talk to a good real estate, CPA, who knows the space incredibly well and get their insights. But I mean a lot of the basics apply here, right? George is, like I actually mentioned, having a separate account, not commingling everything. Really understanding what the expenses are related to the unit that you’re not living in, right? Making sure that you’re getting all your deductions there. And I wonder, I’ve never asked this question before, but I wonder, Ash maybe can you do a cost segregation study on a house hack? And if so, I would assume that just maybe take the percentage that’s not being lived in by you. Do you know the answer to that? I’d assume the answer is yes, you can. I don’t, yeah, no, I don’t would ask that question for sure, George, because if you can do a cost segregation setting and that’ll also help kind of offset some of your tax liability from the revenue that you’re generating from this rental as well. So something to look into, any tax advice outside of that house you feel George might need to know.

Ashley:
The only thing I can think of is maximizing your expenses as to can you prorate your utilities because they’re occupying X percentage of the house so you can write off so much of the utility usage. Things like that is what I would want to talk to a CPA about is to see if I was able to do that.

Tony :
Alright, so our last and final question today comes from Z who and Z says, I’m looking to rent out a room in my residence potentially to a college student taking summer courses or internships. What is the best way to approach this? Should I make a three month lease, June to August considered a short-term slash midterm rental stay put cash under the table with no lease? Would this be considered a sole proprietor LC for tax filing? Alright, so a couple things to break down here. So Z says that I’m looking to rent out a room, so just a room, not even the entire unit, just a room within Z’s personal residence. So first piece here is should I make a three month lease or should I just put cash under the table with no lease? Ash, what’s your take first on lease versus no lease?

Ashley:
Well, every investor loves cash,

Tony :
But

Ashley:
Literally not cash because it’s way better to actually have an agreement in place. We heard a bunch of horror stories, including Lakers, who was recently on about getting squatters in your property and you don’t want somebody to move into your property and there’d be no lease agreement and they actually create their own fake lease agreement to say that they actually do live there. So definitely would put a lease agreement in place. I think your proposal of doing a three month lease from June to August is great. First of all, make sure that you can actually, oh, it’s your primary residence. I was going to say make sure you have permission from the landlord to actually sublease. But yeah, do the three month lease from June to August, but you could also list it on Airbnb and just have them book the three months. So we do that for any medium term rentals.

Ashley:
We have them book directly through Airbnb. It’s just so much easier because we have the system set up and we feel like there’s support from Airbnb, there’s the air coverage, but I have actually learned a lot by going to different conferences, including Tony’s conferences, summit and other ones as to it’s very easy to go out and find other insurance that protects you and protects the renter too. So that shouldn’t be something holding me back from making that transition. But that’s the way we do it for any midterm rental, we just have them book it through Airbnb because it is the simplest, easiest thing for me to not have to spend a lot of time on it. But I do know other investors that actually do a lease agreement and they’ll use rent ready to have them electronically sign the lease agreement to make payment, things like that.

Tony :
Yeah, right with you Ash, we usually go through just the online travel agency, so Airbnb and VRBO for our midterm stays as well. We’ve got one guy who’s been in one of our units for, I think he’s going on month four right now and just every month he just re-ups for another month and we’ve had to move him around between units a couple of times, but he’s been with us for almost four months now. I think there’s so little headache or admin work related to just running it through Airbnb. So I like that. Is he another option to source potential tenants? You could go through Furnish Finder, that’s another option for you. Local Facebook groups for folks who might be posting, looking for places to stay. If you go that route, obviously you would have to create your own lease for that timeframe because Furnace Finder is just a marketplace. It doesn’t actually facilitate the transactions, but those are options for you as well. I would though caution you to make sure you have some kind of agreement in place, either through Airbnb or some kind of rental agreement and not go the route of having no lease because Ashley said squatters are a real thing. Actually, I got to share this because I read this article, Ashley, lemme know if you saw this in there. It’s a guy, his name is Flash Shelton. Flash Shelton is his name. So if you guys Google his name, I think that

Ashley:
Shelton would’ve stuck out to me. So I don’t think I know this story.

Tony :
This guy is a professional squatter remover. So his service, it’s a service that he offers to people where he’ll go and squat on your squatter. So he’ll camp outside the home, try and get an understanding of when they go, when they leave, and once he has a good idea of their patterns when they leave the house, he’ll go in, come in with the lease of his own, signed by the landlord saying, I have a lease, and he’ll move in on top of the squatters. And he said usually they’re out within a day. So if you do ever get caught with a squatter, look up Flash Shelton, he might be able to help you out.

Ashley:
That’s so funny because when Laca first told me, and we did this off the record, off the air is when she told me what was happening, I was like, why don’t you just get some big macho guy to just move in with all his guns

Tony :
And everything. That’s literally what this guy is. He comes in with three of his friends, they’re all armed, who would want to stay in there? And he said they’re just in there eating food, turning up the volume on the tv, just doing anything they can to annoy these people. And he’s had, based on the article that I read, a 100% success rate of getting people out. Wow. Oh my gosh. So anyway, flash Shelton, if you guys are looking for someone to remove your squatter, no way. Maybe he’ll sponsor our podcast. I was going to say, we got to get into sponsors. I read that story, I was like, this is crazy. Cool. Awesome. Well, Z hopefully got some value from that, but just a few things to consider. You’re getting into that summer room rental. Well guys, great episode today. Really loved opening up with Chase’s story about using his electric vehicles to fund his down payment for his rental property. We talked about house hacking, we talked about ADUs and obviously finished off with a couple of questions here as well. So if you guys haven’t yet, please give us a follow on whatever podcast platform it’s you’re listening to. If you’re on YouTube, be sure to subscribe. Mine and Ashley’s contact info are down in the show notes for today’s episode. But as always, guys, we appreciate you hanging out with us. If

Ashley:
You would like to have your question answered on rookie reply, you can go to biggerpockets.com/reply. Thank you guys so much for listening. I’m Ashley. And he’s Tony, and we’ll see you guys next time.

 

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Note By BiggerPockets: These are opinions written by the author and do not necessarily represent the opinions of BiggerPockets.

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